Texas state controversial voter identification law was struck down by federal court

Texas state controversial voter identification law was struck down by federal court, passing a ruling to stop state officials from enforcing the measure.

According to U.S. District Judge’s ruling the law was discriminating towards black and Hispanic voters and violates the Voting Rights Act.

The original law of 2011, make it necessary for the registered voters to present one of the seven forms of government-issued photo ID to cast their vote. Lawmakers responded to that and came up with revamped version of voter identification law this summer.

On Wednesday, enforcement of that law is banned by Judge as well. In response to ruling given by the judge, Texas Attorney General said that he will go for appeal, the state lawmakers have sufficiently reviewed the original law and removed the discriminatory features. He further said U.S. Department of justice is satisfied with the amended voter ID law.

Attorney General also stated that it is essential to safeguard the integrity of election in Texas and to preserve democracy. He expects the 5th Circuit should reverse the district court’s ruling in totality.

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